Asteraceae: artichoke

 

Genus: Cynara

Tender perennial, treated as annual. Start early (Jan) from seed indoors, transplant into 4" pots, expose to cold weather (40°) in March/April to vernalize -produce flowers (but protect from very low temperatures). Plant in rich soil, black plastic mulch helps in accelerating growth in spring. In hot summer, mulching and irrigation helps to cool roots and prevent heat dormancy. Blossoms are insect pollinated and when flower matures and dries on stalk harvest seeds. Roots must be protected (below 20°F) for winter survival. Second year plants provide a bigger harvests, spring buds and a better opportunity for maturing ripe seed. Seeds of Cynara species will produce an interesting variable population. We provide seeds from many sources. Propagate outstanding plants you develop by suckers at base of plant.


Artichoke ( Cynara scolymus)


  BLEND- Blend of Globe Artichokes

We have had some success bringing artichokes to fruit (actually bud) when started sufficiently early. They produce big, beautiful thistle-like plants with great grayish foliage  This blend comes from the collection of varieties that we have acquired. We haven't yet had success producing crosses- maybe you will succeed. Interesting thistle flowers when you let them bloom. We provide seed as a service to home breeders. Pkt. (30 seeds).



web source on globe artichokes:

http://nwrec.hort.oregonstate.edu/artichgl.html



Cardoon (Cynara cardunculus)


BLEND-Blend of Cardoons (artichoke thistle)

Impressively large thistle-like plants which are sometimes used as a landscape accent or background plant. We grew some in planters for the tall gray foliage surrounded by colorful annuals. Related to the globe artichoke (which is also nice in the landscape).  Requires a long, cool growing season, rich soil and adequate moisture for best thick stalks.  In the fall these are tied in order to blanch the center stems which are prepared.  Tangy artichoke flavored "stems".  Watch stalks (leaf petioles) for fine spines on some varieties. We have not succeeded producing seed here on Long Island and provide seeds as a service to breeders. Pkt. (30 seeds).



web source on growing cardoon:

http://nwrec.hort.oregonstate.edu/cardoon.html


Updated 2-10

 

Artichoke Seed and Cardoon Seed